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Northwest Michigan Bestsellers for the week ending 11/5/17

Turtles All the Way Down Cover Image
$19.99
ISBN: 9780525555360
Availability: On Our Shelves Now
Published: Dutton Books for Young Readers - October 10th, 2017

(LIST PRICE: $19.99)

#1 New York Times Bestseller - #1 Wall Street Journal Bestseller - #1 International Bestseller - USA Today Bestseller "Astonishing.... So surprising and moving and true that I became completely unstrung." - The New York Times It's quite rare to find someone who sees the same world you see.

Sixteen-year-old Aza never intended to pursue the mystery of fugitive billionaire Russell Pickett, but there's a hundred-thousand-dollar reward at stake and her Best and Most Fearless Friend, Daisy, is eager to investigate. So together, they navigate the short distance and broad divides that separate them from Russell Pickett's son, Davis. Aza is trying. She is trying to be a good daughter, a good friend, a good student, and maybe even a good detective, while also living within the ever-tightening spiral of her own thoughts. In his long-awaited return, John Green, the acclaimed, award-winning author of Looking for Alaska and The Fault in Our Stars, shares Aza's story with shattering, unflinching clarity in this brilliant novel of love, resilience, and the power of lifelong friendship.


Two Kinds of Truth Cover Image
$29.00
ISBN: 9780316225908
Availability: On Our Shelves Now
Published: Little Brown and Company - October 31st, 2017

(LIST PRICE: $29.00)

Harry Bosch searches for the truth in the new thriller from #1 NYT bestselling author Michael Connelly
An Amazon Book of the Month

Harry Bosch is back as a volunteer working cold cases for the San Fernando Police Department and is called out to a local drug store where a young pharmacist has been murdered. Bosch and the town's 3-person detective squad sift through the clues, which lead into the dangerous, big business world of pill mills and prescription drug abuse. Meanwhile, an old case from Bosch's LAPD days comes back to haunt him when a long-imprisoned killer claims Harry framed him, and seems to have new evidence to prove it. Bosch left the LAPD on bad terms, so his former colleagues aren't keen to protect his reputation. He must fend for himself in clearing his name and keeping a clever killer in prison. The two unrelated cases wind around each other like strands of barbed wire. Along the way Bosch discovers that there are two kinds of truth: the kind that sets you free and the kind that leaves you buried in darkness.


Before We Were Yours Cover Image
$26.00
ISBN: 9780425284681
Availability: On Our Shelves Now
Published: Ballantine Books - June 6th, 2017

(LIST PRICE: $26.00)

NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER - For readers of Orphan Train and The Nightingale comes a "thought-provoking and] complex tale about two families, two generations apart . . . based on a notorious true-life scandal."* Memphis, 1939. Twelve-year-old Rill Foss and her four younger siblings live a magical life aboard their family's Mississippi River shantyboat. But when their father must rush their mother to the hospital one stormy night, Rill is left in charge--until strangers arrive in force. Wrenched from all that is familiar and thrown into a Tennessee Children's Home Society orphanage, the Foss children are assured that they will soon be returned to their parents--but they quickly realize the dark truth. At the mercy of the facility's cruel director, Rill fights to keep her sisters and brother together in a world of danger and uncertainty. Aiken, South Carolina, present day. Born into wealth and privilege, Avery Stafford seems to have it all: a successful career as a federal prosecutor, a handsome fiance, and a lavish wedding on the horizon. But when Avery returns home to help her father weather a health crisis, a chance encounter leaves her with uncomfortable questions and compels her to take a journey through her family's long-hidden history, on a path that will ultimately lead either to devastation or to redemption. Based on one of America's most notorious real-life scandals--in which Georgia Tann, director of a Memphis-based adoption organization, kidnapped and sold poor children to wealthy families all over the country--Lisa Wingate's riveting, wrenching, and ultimately uplifting tale reminds us how, even though the paths we take can lead to many places, the heart never forgets where we belong.


The Alice Network Cover Image
$16.99
ISBN: 9780062654199
Availability: On Our Shelves Now
Published: William Morrow & Company - June 6th, 2017

(LIST PRICE:$16.99)

USA TODAY BESTSELLER

#1 GLOBE AND MAIL HISTORICAL FICTION BESTSELLER

Reese Witherspoon Book Club Summer Reading Pick

One of Amazon's Best Books of June

One of Goodreads' Best Books of June

A Summer Book Pick from Good Housekeeping, Parade, Library Journal, Goodreads, Liz and Lisa, and BookBub

In an enthralling new historical novel from national bestselling author Kate Quinn, two women--a female spy recruited to the real-life Alice Network in France during World War I and an unconventional American socialite searching for her cousin in 1947--are brought together in a mesmerizing story of courage and redemption.

1947. In the chaotic aftermath of World War II, American college girl Charlie St. Clair is pregnant, unmarried, and on the verge of being thrown out of her very proper family. She's also nursing a desperate hope that her beloved cousin Rose, who disappeared in Nazi-occupied France during the war, might still be alive. So when Charlie's parents banish her to Europe to have her "little problem" taken care of, Charlie breaks free and heads to London, determined to find out what happened to the cousin she loves like a sister.

1915. A year into the Great War, Eve Gardiner burns to join the fight against the Germans and unexpectedly gets her chance when she's recruited to work as a spy. Sent into enemy-occupied France, she's trained by the mesmerizing Lili, the "Queen of Spies," who manages a vast network of secret agents right under the enemy's nose.

Thirty years later, haunted by the betrayal that ultimately tore apart the Alice Network, Eve spends her days drunk and secluded in her crumbling London house. Until a young American barges in uttering a name Eve hasn't heard in decades, and launches them both on a mission to find the truth...no matter where it leads.


Missing Persons Cover Image
$14.95
ISBN: 9781941209639
Availability: On Our Shelves Now
Published: Press 53 - September 26th, 2017

(LIST PRICE: $14.95)
Missing Persons by Stephanie Carpenter won the 2017 Press 53 Award for Short Fiction. These ten stories, all of which were published in literary journals including Crab Orcahrd Review, Nimrod International Journal, and The Missouri Review, offer readers a glimpse into the lives of ordinary people facing out-of-the-ordinary problems—street sweepers sending incomplete messages that a young couple is compelled to decipher; a young woman travels back home with her boyfriend to help him sort through the lives of his deceased parents; a woman smitten with a living-statue artist; and a man finding himself with an unwanted house guest he met through a dating app. "These stories," says Jim Shepard, author of The Book of Aron and The World to Come, "are piercingly smart on how unsettling our everyday intimacies can be, and heartening in their faith in our responsibility to always make sure that we’ve nevertheless done what we could." A native of northern Michigan, Stephanie Carpenter holds an MFA from Syracuse University and a PhD in Creative Writing and American Literature from the University of Missouri. Widely published in literary magazines and journals, Missing Persons is her debut story collection.


Windigo Moon: A Novel of Native America Cover Image
$17.95
ISBN: 9781943075362
Availability: On Our Shelves Now
Published: Blank Slate Press - September 5th, 2017

(LIST PRICE: $17.95)

The great love of Blue Heron and Red Bear sustain an Ojibwe clan as it struggles to survive war, famine, and the coming of foreign explorers bearing deadly diseases.

The blood feud between two rival warriors over the love of Ashagi, a strong-willed woman of great beauty and greater determination threads through this story of one Ojibwe clan on the cusp of great change. A young woman from a peaceful village, Ashagi (Blue Heron) is abducted in a raid conducted by the Sioux, the ancestral enemies of her clan, and made a concubine of a fat, slovenly chief who already has two wives. When she is rescued by Misko (Red Bear), an Ojibwe youth, the two fall in love and a lifelong bond is formed. But Nika, Misko's rival, demands that Misko surrender Ashagi to replace his brother who was killed during a raid involving the young warriors' two clans. As Nika's pride and obsession with Ashagi eats away at his sanity, greater danger for the whole Ojibwe way of life creeps ever closer.

Warfare, vengeance, supernatural monsters, and strange spirits all claw at the edges of this love triangle, but the power of the clan and the love of family and tradition helps sustain a culture on the verge of harrowing times. Beginning in 1588 and spanning twenty-five years, WINDIGO MOON encompasses warring tribes of the Upper Great Lakes, the onset of the Little Ice Age of the 1600s, the diseases introduced by foreign explorers, and, always and forever, the great love of Blue Heron and Red Bear.

Meticulously researched and beautifully written, WINDIGO MOON will appeal to fans of Kathleen O'Neal Gear and W. Michael Gear, Jean Auel, Alexander Thom, Anna Lee Waldo, and other top authors of historical fiction.


The Odyssey of Echo Company: The 1968 Tet Offensive and the Epic Battle to Survive the Vietnam War Cover Image
$24.00
ISBN: 9781476761916
Availability: On Our Shelves Now
Published: Scribner Book Company - September 19th, 2017

(LIST PRICE:$24.00)

A powerful work of literary military history from the New York Times bestselling author of In Harm's Way and Horse Soldiers, the harrowing, redemptive, and utterly unforgettable account of an American army reconnaissance platoon's fight for survival during the Vietnam War--whose searing experiences reverberate today among the millions of American families touched by this war. On a single night, January 31, 1968, as many as 100,000 soldiers in the North Vietnamese Army attacked thirty-six cities throughout South Vietnam, hoping to topple the government and dislodge American forces. Forty young American soldiers of an army reconnaissance platoon (Echo Company, 1/501) of the 101st Airborne Division and hailing from small farms, beach towns, and such big cities as Chicago and Los Angeles are suddenly thrust into savage combat, having been in-country only a few weeks. Their battles against both North Vietnamese Army soldiers and toughened Viet Cong guerillas are relentless, often hand-to-hand, and waged night and day across landing zones, rice paddies, hamlets, and dense jungle. The exhausting day-to-day existence, which involves ambushes on both sides, grueling gun battles, and heroic rescues of wounded comrades, forges the group into a lifelong brotherhood. The Odyssey of Echo Company is about the young men who survived this epic span, and centers on the searing experiences of one of them, Stanley Parker, who is wounded three times during the fighting. When the young men come home, some encounter a country that doesn't understand what they have suffered and survived. Many of them fall silent, knowing that few of their countrymen want to hear the remarkable story they have lived to tell--until now. Based on hundreds of hours of interviews, dozens of personal letters written in the combat zone, Pentagon after-action reports, and travel to the battle sites with some of the soldiers (who meet their Vietnamese counterpart), and augmented by detailed maps and remarkable combat zone photographs, The Odyssey of Echo Company breaks through the wall of time to recount ordinary young American men in an extraordinary time in America and confirms Doug Stanton's prominence as an unparalleled storyteller of our age.


Nine Lessons I Learned from My Father Cover Image
$19.96
ISBN: 9780735234178
Availability: On Our Shelves Now
Published: Viking - October 31st, 2017

(LIST PRICE $19.96)

Part Tuesdays with Morrie, part Mr. Hockey, Nine Lessons I Learned from My Father is a son's intimate account of all that lies behind the towering legacy of the beloved Gordie Howe. When Gordie Howe passed away, the world paused to acknowledge the legacy of the game's greatest player. For twelve straight hours--9 to 9--thousands of mourners passed through Joe Louis Arena in Detroit to pay their respects. The game's elder statesmen dropped what they were doing to gather for the funeral. Fans young and old flew in from around the world. Wayne Gretzky argued that Howe's number 9 should be retired league-wide. Barack Obama issued a statement recognizing what Gordie Howe meant to the game.
As one after another dignitary spoke, it became clear that as staggering as Howe's achievements were on the ice, he was even greater as a person. In story after story, friends and rivals alike painted a portrait of a man the likes of which we may never see again. How could someone so revered also be so humble? How could someone who fought so hard also be so gentle? How could someone of whom so much was expected routinely astonish those around him by doing more? The man named Gordie Howe--not the hockey player, not the legend, but the living, breathing man--came into focus when his son, Murray, approached the podium to deliver the eulogy. The mourners in the packed cathedral, and those watching on television, got a glimpse of what a man who was a hero to generations looked like to his own children, and what his life looked like to those whose lives he shaped.
The Gordie Howe his son introduced to the world was in many ways a teacher. Through his words and, more importantly, through his actions, he showed those around him what it means to live a life you can be proud of. Those lessons formed the backbone of the eulogy his son delivered, as it does the book that grew out of it.
Unlike his two brothers, Murray Howe failed in his attempt to follow in his father's footsteps to become a professional athlete. Yet, his failure brought him to the realization that in truth, his dream wasn't to be a pro hockey player. His dream was to be his father, Gordie Howe. To be amazing at something, but humble and gracious. To be courageous, and stand up for the little guy. To be a hero. You don't need to be a hockey player to do that. What he learned was that it is a waste of time wishing you were like someone else. We need to identify and embrace our gifts.
Gordie Howe may have been the greatest player in the history of hockey, but greatness was never defined by goals or assists in the Howe household. Greatness meant being the best person you could be, not the best player on the ice.
This book will take the reader through the hours Murray spent writing the eulogy--the hours immediately after his father's death, as he gathers his thoughts and memories, and makes sense of what his remarkable father meant to him. The result is nine lessons, built out of hundreds of stories, that show us the man behind the legend and give us a glimpse of what we can learn from this incredible life.


Tribe: On Homecoming and Belonging Cover Image
$17.60
ISBN: 9781455566389
Availability: On Our Shelves Now
Published: Twelve - May 24th, 2016

(LIST PRICE $17.60)

Now a New York Times bestseller
We have a strong instinct to belong to small groups defined by clear purpose and understanding--"tribes." This tribal connection has been largely lost in modern society, but regaining it may be the key to our psychological survival. Decades before the American Revolution, Benjamin Franklin lamented that English settlers were constantly fleeing over to the Indians-but Indians almost never did the same. Tribal society has been exerting an almost gravitational pull on Westerners for hundreds of years, and the reason lies deep in our evolutionary past as a communal species. The most recent example of that attraction is combat veterans who come home to find themselves missing the incredibly intimate bonds of platoon life. The loss of closeness that comes at the end of deployment may explain the high rates of post-traumatic stress disorder suffered by military veterans today. Combining history, psychology, and anthropology, TRIBE explores what we can learn from tribal societies about loyalty, belonging, and the eternal human quest for meaning. It explains the irony that-for many veterans as well as civilians-war feels better than peace, adversity can turn out to be a blessing, and disasters are sometimes remembered more fondly than weddings or tropical vacations. TRIBE explains why we are stronger when we come together, and how that can be achieved even in today's divided world.


The 360 Degree Leader: Developing Your Influence from Anywhere in the Organization Cover Image
$16.99
ISBN: 9781400203598
Availability: On Our Shelves Now
Published: Thomas Nelson - October 17th, 2011

(LIST PRICE $16.99)

Don't wait for that promotion Start leading NOW...right where you are

What's the number one question leadership expert John C. Maxwell is asked while conducting his leadership conferences? "How can I implement what you teach when I'm not the top leader?." Is it possible to lead well when you're not the top dog? How about if the person you work for is a bad leader? The answer is a resounding yes

Welcome to The 360 Leader. People who desire to lead from the middle of organizations face unique challenges. And they are often held back by myths that prevent them from developing their influence. Dr. Maxwell, one of the globe's most trusted leadership mentors, debunks the myths, shows you how to overcome the challenges, and teaches you the skills you need to become a 360 leader.

If you have found yourself trying to lead from the middle of the organization, as the vast majority of professionals do, then you need Maxwell's insights. You have a unique opportunity to exercise influence in all directions--up (to the boss), across (among your peers), and down (to those you lead). The good news is that your influence is greater than you know.

Practice the disciplines of 360 leadership and the opportunities will be endless . . . for your organization, for your career, and for your life.


(LIST PRICE $15.95)

We respect wolves, hawks and bobcats, love songbirds and lilies and are moved by a sunset observed through pine boughs, but we do not care for poison ivy or winged ants.  We ignore lichens even though we see them growing on trees everywhere, and we may not even know the names of other things that occupy our world: ventifacts, grape ferns, and club mosses.  This book will awaken the reader to events and things tuned out and forgotten in the noisy, rushing environment of our lives.  It is a safari to nearby places.


Isadore's Secret: Sin, Murder, and Confession in a Northern Michigan Town Cover Image
$22.95
ISBN: 9780472050796
Availability: On Our Shelves Now
Published: University of Michigan Press - September 1st, 2009

(LIST PRICE: $22.95)

On August 23, 1907, Sister Janina waved good-bye to her priest, who was headed out for an afternoon of fishing, and retired to her convent cell to take a nap. She was never seen again. The young Felician nun lived in Isadore, Michigan, a tiny town in the state's sparsely populated Leelenau Peninsula. But that didn't stop her case from making national waves.

More than 400 people from the area searched for her, but for more than a decade her disappearance remained a mystery. Her fellow nuns listed her as "lost" in their book of records, and so she remained until an ambitious priest launched a campaign to build a new church at Isadore. That's when her skeleton was found buried in the dirt-floored basement of the old church, causing an uproar that scandalized the small farming town.

Mardi Link's previous true-crime novel, "When Evil Came to Good Hart, " focused on the 1968 murder of a wealthy Detroit area family in their northern Michigan cabin. It was an instant success, topping area best-seller lists and generating rave reviews nationwide. This time Link turns her journalistic and detective skills to a shocking story that remained buried for years.

"Isadore's Secret" has all the ingredients of a terrific whodunit: a young woman murdered, the Catholic confessional, the Michigan Supreme Court, bishops, doctors, priests, detectives, lumbermen, a spy, and one diminutive Polish housekeeper. Many details of the case have been kept secret even into the present day, more than a century later . . . until now. The book gives readers a historic and compelling yarn of sin, murder, and confession, and its sometimes macabre and far-fetched nature makes it all the more shocking that it is a true story, a work of nonfiction.

Mardi Link is a freelance journalist and a founder of Michigan Writers, a nonprofit support group for working writers. She is cofounder and former executive editor of "ForeWord Magazine." In 2007, she was named Antioch's Betty Crumrine Scholar for Creative Nonfiction and was a finalist for the Annie Dillard Creative Nonfiction Award. This is her second book; her first, "When Evil Came to Good Hart, " also published by the University of Michigan Press, spent four months on the Heartland Indie Bestseller List.